Surviving the transition from classes to research in your PhD

Readers of this blog might have noticed that I have not published any post since November last year. This is because I spent the past eight months struggling and surviving the transition from a student to a researcher of economics. During this transition, I have experienced many episodes of self doubt and breakdowns, and my confidence plunged so much that I did not think I would put down any meaningful thoughts. Fortunately, I was able to learn from my struggles and successfully defended my PhD prospectus a month ago (I’m a PhD candidate now!). In this post I hope to share with you what I have learned from my experience.

  • Once you have identified a research topic (not even a specific question), go talk to faculty members with relevant expertise immediately. This sounds daunting, but you should do it because 1) they will be able to point out strengths/weaknesses of your research ideas and save you time, and 2) it will teach you how to communicate with others about your ideas, which you will need to learn eventually.
  • Find at least one faculty member whom you can communicate with on a regular basis. Conducting innovative research is no small task, and you will need guidance at the beginning of this journey. Talking with faculty regularly can also help you feel that you are constantly making progress, which is more important than you think.
  • Time management is crucial to a successful transition from a student to a researcher. Without a class schedule, you can easily develop habits that reduce your productivity. What I have found to be most useful is to develop a routine: set a fixed amount of time where you go to the office and work on your research, but also leave time for social activities and rest. Make sure you have some time to rest everyday so you have something to look forward to when research is not going well (that happens a lot!).
  • Put yourself out there. Do not take negative feedback personally; accept it and improve yourself based on it. When I presented my research for the first time in my second year, I felt so bad about receiving “negative” feedback that I burst into tears in the middle of the presentation. I decided the only solution to this fear of presentation is to present more. Therefore, I presented two more times in the first semester of my third year, trying to do just a little bit better each time. Now I am proud to say that I can present my research ideas clearly and peacefully.
  • Sharpen your communication skills, in writing and in person. Good interpersonal communication skills allow you to make a stronger impression, so others are more likely to remember your research and give meaningful feedback on it. Good writing (in academic papers and in daily email correspondence) will make others understand your goals and help you achieve them. Personally, I always take clear, on-point emails and as a sign that the other person appreciates my time. This makes me want to communicate with them and help them.
  • Do not work in isolation. This is very, very, very important. Because research is highly risky and things don’t turn out the way you expect 99% of the time, you need support along the way. Make sure your office is close to your friends’, and talk to them regularly. At the minimum, they will be able to share your frustration in research. NEVER sacrifice your social life for a marginal increase in “time devoted to research” (which, as we all know, is likely to be devoted to social media).
  • Be more supportive and less judgmental of others. Research is hard, and we all know it. Instead of trashing others’ research, try to understand it and offer your colleagues constructive feedback. If you don’t understand it, maybe you can offer advice on how it can be more understandable.

P.S. I am determined to publish at least one post per week from today on. Stay tuned.