Surviving the transition from classes to research in your PhD

Readers of this blog might have noticed that I have not published any post since November last year. This is because I spent the past eight months struggling and surviving the transition from a student to a researcher of economics. During this transition, I have experienced many episodes of self doubt and breakdowns, and my confidence plunged so much that I did not think I would put down any meaningful thoughts. Fortunately, I was able to learn from my struggles and successfully defended my PhD prospectus a month ago (I’m a PhD candidate now!). In this post I hope to share with you what I have learned from my experience.

  • Once you have identified a research topic (not even a specific question), go talk to faculty members with relevant expertise immediately. This sounds daunting, but you should do it because 1) they will be able to point out strengths/weaknesses of your research ideas and save you time, and 2) it will teach you how to communicate with others about your ideas, which you will need to learn eventually.
  • Find at least one faculty member whom you can communicate with on a regular basis. Conducting innovative research is no small task, and you will need guidance at the beginning of this journey. Talking with faculty regularly can also help you feel that you are constantly making progress, which is more important than you think.
  • Time management is crucial to a successful transition from a student to a researcher. Without a class schedule, you can easily develop habits that reduce your productivity. What I have found to be most useful is to develop a routine: set a fixed amount of time where you go to the office and work on your research, but also leave time for social activities and rest. Make sure you have some time to rest everyday so you have something to look forward to when research is not going well (that happens a lot!).
  • Put yourself out there. Do not take negative feedback personally; accept it and improve yourself based on it. When I presented my research for the first time in my second year, I felt so bad about receiving “negative” feedback that I burst into tears in the middle of the presentation. I decided the only solution to this fear of presentation is to present more. Therefore, I presented two more times in the first semester of my third year, trying to do just a little bit better each time. Now I am proud to say that I can present my research ideas clearly and peacefully.
  • Sharpen your communication skills, in writing and in person. Good interpersonal communication skills allow you to make a stronger impression, so others are more likely to remember your research and give meaningful feedback on it. Good writing (in academic papers and in daily email correspondence) will make others understand your goals and help you achieve them. Personally, I always take clear, on-point emails and as a sign that the other person appreciates my time. This makes me want to communicate with them and help them.
  • Do not work in isolation. This is very, very, very important. Because research is highly risky and things don’t turn out the way you expect 99% of the time, you need support along the way. Make sure your office is close to your friends’, and talk to them regularly. At the minimum, they will be able to share your frustration in research. NEVER sacrifice your social life for a marginal increase in “time devoted to research” (which, as we all know, is likely to be devoted to social media).
  • Be more supportive and less judgmental of others. Research is hard, and we all know it. Instead of trashing others’ research, try to understand it and offer your colleagues constructive feedback. If you don’t understand it, maybe you can offer advice on how it can be more understandable.

P.S. I am determined to publish at least one post per week from today on. Stay tuned.

Lessons learnt on communication

The following are what I learnt from doing research and explaining my research to others.

  1. When communicating about a big decision that involves complex emotions, do it in person. Talking in person allows you to be mindful of each others’ emotions and guide the conversation to the most effective direction.
  2. When writing a professional email, make them short and to-the-point. State your requests explicitly.
  3. Acknowledge the differences in communication styles between men and women. Men are usually a lot more direct and less considerate about others’ feelings. But being considerate about others’ feelings can go too far, in which case the effectiveness of communication is compromised.
  4. When you want feedback on a particular idea, make sure you know what exact questions you have and what you need to explain so that others are on the same page. Guide your feedback around your goal, and harvest small critiques along the way.
  5. When you can ask a question by email, do not schedule a meeting. Meetings are the best for organic, open-ended discussions.

2015 年终总结

今年是我在美国第一次真正意义上过感恩节和圣诞节。我们认认真真地把礼物摆到圣诞树下,认认真真地拆开给彼此的礼物。看到对方欣喜的表情,心里觉得很温暖。

不知不觉,又一年过去了。

这一年对我来说,是充满戏剧性也充满成长的一年。学业上,我感受到了学术研究的挑战性,也明白了过度的完美主义只能创造焦虑而不能解决实际问题。生活上,一段感情的结束和另一段的开始让我明白了不是所有幸福的开始都有美满的结局,真正长久的感情需要个人的成熟作为基础。

事事都有两面。这一年的种种戏剧性让我学会了如何在迷雾中保持自己的方向。年初的时候我在手机里装上了Insight Timer的app, 每天早上冥想5分钟,聆听内心的声音,增进对自己的了解,也更能看清他人的喜乐。学业上的焦虑令我和师兄师姐增进交流,更加明白PhD是个不断超越自己的过程,享受旅途和追求结果一样重要。

这一年,我重拾声乐这个爱好,在Duke开始跟一位老师学习歌剧演唱。学期最后我竟然能稳稳当当地唱到B minor,在几十个人面前表演也不会腿脚打颤,想想也是不小的成就。

这一年,我开始练习普拉提(pilates),坚持一周练习一到两次。这项刚柔并济而充满美感的运动让我变得更轻盈,更有活力,也更自信了。在此鼓励大家尝试!

好友们各有各的生活:有的在世界各地飞来飞去忙事业,有的找到了自己的另一半幸福地安顿下来了,有的还是浑浑噩噩不知每天在忙什么。我这一年最大的感触就是: 单纯的比较是毫无意义的。明白自己想要什么,而且勇敢地去追求,这样才能得到真正的幸福。工作与爱情都是如此。

最后祝大家新年快乐,在2016心想事成!

 

What I have learned from my first academic presentation

Yesterday I presented my work on parental migration and health outcomes of children in Indonesia in the development lunch at Duke. It was my first time to present my own research in front of a (relatively) large academic audience. The presentation did not progress as planned (similar with most research initiatives), but I learned a great deal from it. Here’s a few.

  1. Talk about key facts instead of broad histories when you are introducing the context of your study. Providing a description of broad histories is easy for you as a presenter but usually makes the audience more confused about your main argument.
  2. Related to the first point, structure your presentation to focus on the key questions you are interested in answering, the strategies you use to address these questions, and where you have experienced difficulty and need advice on.
  3. In a short presentation, avoid doing a detailed literature review. You are almost guaranteed to miss some papers in the literature, and it is easy to spend a long time answering tangential questions.
  4. Know your question really, really well. Present it to different people and see if anything confuses them. If they are confused, try to diagnose the problem and clarify your question. If there are broad terms in your main question, try to narrow them down to clear-cut, specific definitions that people can directly relate to.
  5. Know when to answer questions, when to delay them, and when to politely turn them down. Always answer clarification questions, but delay questions which you are going to address later in your presentation.
  6. Practice. Practice. Practice. You cannot anticipate everything, but if you do not practice, there will be too many awkward moments.

I encourage other students to present their work early on in the PhD program to practice thinking deeply about a question and explaining it to other people. It will be painful at first, but you will get better at it over time.

Two iPhone apps for meditation

If you are looking for peace in a busy life, or simply want to set some free space in your brain, the following apps might be useful.

– Headspace: guided 10-minute meditations. Pre-recorded by a British young man. It has a ten-day trial period, but charges a fee afterwards.

– Insight Timer: provides free, pre-recorded guided meditation by famous meditation practitioners (Thich Nhat Hahn, for example). You can also share your life experiences and thoughts on meditation on a discussion forum.

2015: Learn, Explore, Create

2014 has been a great year for me. I experienced a lot of uncertainty and anxiety but have also become much more mature. For 2015, here are a few of my keywords:

* Learn *

Learn about economics, in terms of both theory and empirical methods. As a first-year PhD student, learning is my priority. I have come to realize that without a deep understanding about the current literature, ideas are often either too shallow or too outdated. I should also develop my own perspective to see the questions and modeling techniques in different fields under a unified framework, which will allow me to have a bigger repository of ideas and research tools.

Learn about how to communicate ideas, in writing and in person. Writing is like carving a statue out of a bare stone. There are general rules to be followed, but good writing requires a tremendous amount of practice and through this practice, a solid grasp of the reader’s mind.

* Explore *

A fair amount of exploration is needed before one settles on a particular (set of) ideas for dissertation (in the short run) and future research (in the long run). I need to not only be more aware of the resources around me, but also develop the ability to abstract and synthesize relevant information for my own use.

Apart from academics, I hope to explore more about the area where I’m living and to make more friends. This, I believe, will come naturally.

* Create *

The ultimate goal of research is to advance the boundary of human knowledge. Creativity is a key ingredient to good research. I definitely need to improve in this aspect. Hope to come back with more insights in a year.

One important difference between a PhD student and an undergrad/masters student is that work is no longer distinguishable from leisure. Everything seems to be related to economics in some way. While I know economic is very important to me, I am also trying to not be buried in the ivory tower and to communicate with people from other backgrounds. We have a lot to learn from each other.

Finally, a few thoughts on love and distance. If I can give one piece of advice to people in long distance relationships, I would say: don’t see distance as your enemy. View it as an opportunity for you to become more independent individuals. You can achieve personal growth while maintaining the emotional bond with your significant other. Strive to become a better person so that the next time you meet, you are able to deliver more positive energy to each other. Don’t panic if the relationship doesn’t work out — when that happens, it’s rarely about the distance.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Using Bibtex to manage references in LaTex

BibTeX is a useful reference management tool for academic writers. The Wikibooks provides a detailed description on how to use BibTeX. For most references you only need to search the article on GoogleScholar and select “import into BibTeX” to get the codes.

If you are using WinEdt like me, follow this procedure (I imagine the procedure should be similar for other editors) to link BibTeX with Latex and generate the bibliography.

After compiling your .bib file and adding the relevant Latex commands in your .tex file, hit the following key combinations while you’re in .tex file:

  1. CTL-SHIFT-L: runs LaTeX2e. Since the program is designed to work with BibTeX, and you have used the code in your TeX file, it generates an .aux file called which contains all of the citations which you used in the document.
  2. CTL-SHIFT-B: runs BibTeX. This command searches for the “.aux” file, searches your BibTeX file for the relevant citations, and creates a .bbl file containing all information for the works cited in your .tex file. This is a crucial step; without it the citations will appear as question marks and the bibliography won’t be generated.
  3. CTL-SHIFT-L: runs LaTeX2e to let LaTeX create the bibliography inside the document with the bibliography (.bbl) file.
  4. CTL-SHIFT-L: runs LaTeX2e again to make sure all of the references match up.

After every change in your .bib file, you have to do 2-4 again.